Are you ready to teach your students coding in the classroom? Check out this 3-part series from Tech with Jen to learn why students need to learn to code and how you can make it fit into your already busy schedule.

Coding in the Classroom: Is It That Important?

In Inspiration by Jen2 Comments

When coding in the classroom became mainstream, I must admit I wasn’t ready to jump on the bandwagon. For one, I didn’t understand it well. How can I teach students something I don’t know myself? I also worried that it was just a fad. I didn’t see the connection it played in the mandatory curriculum. So I put the idea to the side and let others teach coding to their students.

Then last week I went to a Project Lead the Way conference. I was intrigued by how educators were teaching coding. They were infusing it into their regular subject areas. Integration was something I could get behind. I need a way to show teachers how to use coding in the classroom as part of the curriculum. Teachers have enough on their plate. I don’t want to put more on them. I decided to do some research. Over the next few weeks I am going to share with you what I have learned:

  • Why we should teach coding in the classroom
  • Coding resources you can use in the classroom
  • Use coding for Interactive Storytelling

Are you ready to teach your students coding in the classroom? Check out this 3-part series from Tech with Jen to learn why students need to learn to code and how you can make it fit into your already busy schedule.

I always like to start with the why. One article I read discussed whether we should teach coding to everyone. The author mentioned that coding is deemed, by some, to be a new type of literacy. This idea is one to consider. Technology is changing the way we do things every day and logically effects the jobs of our students’ future.

Another article suggests that coding should be considered “as essential as reading, writing and arithmetic due to its fundamental importance in the digital world we are now living in”. I was intrigued by these strong opinions and needed to know more. I came across a great article from Kodable that gave me specific reasons for teaching kids coding in the classroom.

Why coding in the classroom?

Image compliments of Kodable.com.
5 Reasons to Teach Kids to Code
But if coding is to become emedded in schools wouldn’t it take a massive overhaul in teacher training and honestly a massive overhaul within the curriculum? I consider myself pretty proficient with technology and curriculum but even I didn’t feel comfortable with the idea of teaching my students how to code. Nor could I see the connection between coding and teaching students how to read and write. Teachers need to feel confident in teaching coding skills in the classroom but they also need to be able to do it with what they already do on a day-to-day basis rather than having to add one more thing to their schedule.

Therefore, next week I will share with you some of the coding resources I found that will help give you a jumpstart to teach coding in the classroom. If you have any specific questions, please comment below and I will look into answering them for you in the next post.

3am_jk_signature

 

 

 

Comments

  1. I enjoyed coding with elementary kids with Scratch and the Hour of Code Actvities in the computer lab but I am very intrigued by its application in the academic classroom.

    Like anything new, staff development is so important and necessary. With many years under my belt, I’ve seen seen activities with so much potential become babysitters because of adequate training and support.

    I really look forward to see successful programs highlighted!

    Nancy

  2. Author

    Hey Nancy,

    That is definitely something I am passionate about learning more myself. I love technology and want to teach others how to use it effectively in the classroom rather than the devices becoming glorified babysitters. I think our kids get enough of that outside of school. Come back next week and I’ll share a few things I have found. Thanks for the comment.

Leave a Comment